Exchange with no income from property

Dear 1031x.com,
I bought a lot in a seaside resort community in 1993 for investment. Built a house on the land in 1998 with a partner. The house has never been rented or occupied except for quarterly maintenance (2-3 days each visit). Did not want to rent the house due to bad rental experience with other property. We are talking about selling it now that home prices have substantially increased which was our original intent. I have some documentation (utility bills, gasoline purchases the house is located 6 hours from principal residence) to substantiate the few days that the house has actually been used. Can we do a 1031 exchange of this home?  
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Exchange by Corporation

Dear 1031x.com,
I sold a property in FL, with my corporation, and want to buy other property in another state. Will this bring problems, when the FL company sells this property later on (after one year and one day) ? What if I would buy different (max 3) properties in different states, would this still be a valid 1031 ? 2. Also, the selling price includes a loan of about one third of the selling price. If I am right, the seller of the new property cannot hold part of mortgage to make 1031 fully valid, and I need to look for financing. Will I have trouble financing if company is from other state than property ? 
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Important Question about Carry Forward Basis

One of the most important questions that we answer for customers is: What is an estimate of my tax if I do not do a 1031 exchange? Here is a real life example:Dear 1031x.com: We bought our first rental house in New Jersey in 1985 for $100K, and sold it in 2002 for $183K ($70K depreciation) and bought another rental house in Tennessee with 1031 exchange for 185.5k. Will sell it for about $200K (tax basis $28K, $4522 depreciation). What total tax (fed and state) can we save by doing another exchange? We live in NJ. (9% capital gain tax). 
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Tax Free Cash

Recent tax court ruling liberalizes refinancing under Section 1031: Under section 1031, the general rule is that any cash received by the taxpayer, whether at the sale of the Relinquished Property, or at purchase of the Replacement Property, will be taxed as cash boot. 
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Three Tax Strategies to Maximize Tax Savings in a 1031 Exchange

Failed exchanges can still defer taxes by one year. Exchanges begun after July 5th, that magic time of year, bring into play a little known tax regulation under Section 1031. This regulation allows you to defer tax liability for one year even though a 1031 exchange fails. The general rule is that a 1031x must be reported on the tax return for the year in which the relinquished property sells. Therefore, an exchange started in 2006 must be reported on a 2006 tax return.  
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1031 exchange with complications

Dear 1031x: I left you a voice mail concerning my wife's interest in a house. She and her brother were both put on title of the parents house in 1988. Mother passed away around 1993. Her father passed away around 1997. House was not appraised until this year when my wife decided she wanted to get the cash out and sell her half interest to her brother who lives in it. 
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Calculating the equal or up value rule in a 1031 exchange

There is an often misunderstood rule in 1031 exchanging, that is you must trade equal or up in fair market value to have a fully tax deferred exchange. The answer is that adjustments can be made which will reduce the effective fair market value of the property you are selling. Most people are aware that the cardinal rule of all 1031 exchanges is: You must trade equal or up in value (minus direct costs of selling) to defer all income tax liability. But in a 1031 exchange what are considered the direct costs of selling? No list can be all inclusive but here is a list of costs when calculating the equal or up in value rule for 1031 exchanges. 
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1031 Exchanges - A Brief History

1031x.com is a full service 1031 exchange accomodator. Since 1994, we have assisted thousands of clients with their tax-deferred, like-kind real estate exchanges. The following article will tell you something about 1031 Exchanges, their History and Uses. 
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Calculating the equal or up rule in a 1031 exchange

Most people are aware that the cardinal rule of all 1031 exchanges is: You must trade equal or up in value (minus direct costs of selling) to defer all income tax liability. But in a 1031 exchange what are considered the direct costs of selling? No list can be all inclusive but here is a list of costs when calculating the equal or up in value rule for 1031 exchanges. 
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